Health:Angel for a tribute to nursing

Danish Historical Nursing Museum receives the Health:Angel. Not only in times of Covid is appreciation for nurses more important than ever. With their tireless efforts in the healthcare sector, 1.77 million nurses in Germany alone currently ensure a functioning healthcare system and thus make an important contribution to society. The "Danish Historical Nursing Museum" (Dansk Sygeplejehistorisk Museum), based in Kolding, shows the development of the profession from the Middle Ages to the present day and thus pays tribute to the commitment of every single person in this profession. The Health Media Awards jury has therefore awarded the museum with a Health:Angel, which has now been presented to museum director Trine Gjesing Antvor. Even though people's health has always been an important issue, it was not until 1876 that the first training course for nurses was established much later. Other important dates for the profession were state recognition in 1933 and a reform of the profession in 1957, when the quality of education was increased to meet the complex and growing demands of this so basic and important service. The museum presents this and many other facts in an exemplary manner, arousing visitors' interest in the nursing profession. Also in view of the shortage of skilled nursing staff, this is an important effort for the health care system, because interest can turn into enthusiasm and perhaps even the decision to start one's own career.

Museum Director Trine Gjesing Antvor:

"It's so important to know our history because it's part of understanding who we are today and maybe giving us direction for future challenges."

This also convinced the jury of the Health Media Awards. Jury president Tony Westwood presented the museum with the Health:Angel, a sculpture by Italian artist Massimo Bramandi.

"Here at the Dansk Sygeplejehistorisk Museum, you can trace the development of nursing from the Middle Ages through the centuries and decades",

summed up Tony Westwood, Grand Jury President. The "Oscar" of health communication will find a place in the nursing museum in the future and thus make clear how well the team around Trine Gjesing Antvor has succeeded in building a communicative bridge between past, present and future.

The Health:Angel is sponsored by the Health Media Award e.V..

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